Journal Information

Most cited

25
Biological invasions are as costly as natural hazards
Anna J. Turbelin, Ross N. Cuthbert, Franz Essl, Phillip J. Haubrock, Anthony Ricciardi, Franck Courchamp
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:143-50
25
Highlights

  • Damage costs from biological invasions and natural hazards are of similar magnitude.

  • Global biological invasion costs increased by 702% from 1980–1999 to 2000–2019.

  • Invasion costs increased faster than natural hazard damages over time (1980–2019).

Full text access
9
Global South leadership towards inclusive tropical ecology and conservation
Carolina Ocampo-Ariza, Manuel Toledo-Hernández, Felipe Librán-Embid, Dolors Armenteras, Justine Vansynghel, Estelle Raveloaritiana, Isabelle Arimond, Andrés Angulo-Rubiano, ... Bea Maas
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:17-24
9
Highlights

  • Limited Global South participation and parachute science hampers tropical ecology.

  • Upgrades in equity, diversity and inclusion rooted in the Global South are essential.

  • Tropical conservation practices must be led by local researchers and stakeholders.

  • Recognition of science in the Global South may improve through outreach.

  • International research must provide equitable workloads and recognition to Global South researchers.

Open access
8
Optimal references for ecological restoration: the need to protect references in the tropics
Tiago Shizen Pacheco Toma, Gerhard Ernst Overbeck, Milton de Souza Mendonça, G.Wilson Fernandes
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:25-32
8
Highlights

  • References are key to restoration, especially in highly threatened ecosystems.

  • Optimal references connect conservation and restoration.

  • Small remnants that serve as references can lead to landscape-scale benefits.

  • A detailed habitat classification is needed for adequate protection and restoration.

  • Ensuring optimal references protection will benefit future restoration initiatives.

Open access
7
The effects of natural forest and eucalyptus plantations on seven water-related ecosystem services in Cerrado landscapes
Giulia Baldaconi S. Bispo, Rozely F. Santos, Marcelo L.M. Pompeo, Silvio Frosini. B. Ferraz, Carolina B. Rodrigues, Bruno M. Brentan
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:41-51
7
Highlights

  • We evaluated 7 water-related ES in landscapes with different proportions between eucalyptus and natural forests.

  • There is a threshold close to 20% of forest coverage below which ES supply tends to become unsustainable.

  • The highest gain to the seven ES occurs in catchments with natural forest cover over 45%.

  • Erosion control was the service most linked to natural forest decrease.

Open access
6
Predicting the range expansion of invasive alien grasses under climate change in the Neotropics
Aline Lopes, Layon Orestes Demarchi, Maria Teresa Fernandez Piedade, Jochen Schöngart, Florian Wittmann, Cássia Beatriz Rodrigues Munhoz, Cristiane Silva Ferreira, Augusto Cesar Franco
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:128-35
6
Highlights

  • Not all invasive grasses would be equally affected by climate change.

  • Range retractions are projected for some species regardless of the scenario.

  • We expect species niches to shift to areas not yet occupied.

  • Arundo donax had the greatest range expansion in the SSP3 and SSP5 scenarios.

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6
Habitat protection and restoration: Win–win opportunities for migratory birds in the Northern Andes
Ana M. Gonzalez, Nestor Espejo, Dolors Armenteras, Keith A. Hobson, Kevin J. Kardynal, Greg W. Mitchell, Nancy Mahony, Christine A. Bishop, ... Scott Wilson
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:33-40
6
Highlights

  • Colombia covers over half of key wintering areas for migratory birds in South America.

  • Most of the migrants’ overwinter range overlaps with working landscapes.

  • Priority national restoration/rehabilitation areas are ineffective to benefit migrants.

  • Forest conservation needs actions involving vulnerable and minority groups.

Open access
6
Global biogeographical patterns of ants and their abiotic determinants
Anderson Dantas, Carlos Roberto Fonseca
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:237-46
6
Highlights

  • Estimated ant species richness is higher in the tropical region.

  • Estimated ant species richness was best explained by annual rainfall and mean temperature.

  • The direction and effect of abiotic determinants are relative to the zoogeographic realm analyzed, highlighting regional effects.

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5
Contrasting nation-wide citizen science and expert collected data on hummingbird–plant interactions
Camila Bosenbecker, Pedro Amaral Anselmo, Roberta Zuba Andreoli, Gustavo Hiroaki Shimizu, Paulo Eugênio Oliveira, Pietro Kiyoshi Maruyama
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:164-71
5
Highlights

  • We extracted hummingbird-plant data from an online photograph platform.

  • Data were compared with expert collected data, available in the literature.

  • There were some similarities between citizen and expert data.

  • For the hummingbirds, overlap in plant species interacting was generally low.

  • Unstructured citizen science data can be a rich source of interaction information.

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5
A call for improving the Key Biodiversity Areas framework
Harith Farooq, Alexandre Antonelli, Søren Faurby
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:85-91
5
Highlights

  • The KBA Standards may not be scalable to all biodiversity.

  • If everywhere can be a Key Biodiversity Area, nowhere is “Key”.

  • If any area is “Key” the assessment process is solely based on manageability.

Open access
5
No relationship between biodiversity and forest carbon sink across the subtropical Brazilian Atlantic Forest
Kauane Maiara Bordin, Adriane Esquivel-Muelbert, Joice Klipel, Rayana Caroline Picolotto, Rodrigo Scarton Bergamin, Ana Carolina da Silva, Pedro Higuchi, Elivane Salete Capellesso, ... Sandra Cristina Müller
Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. 2023;21:112-20
5
Highlights

  • Secondary and old-growth subtropical Brazilian Atlantic Forests are acting as carbon sink.

  • Biodiversity is not related to net carbon change in this region.

  • Subtropical Brazilian Atlantic Forests should be conserved irrespective to their ages to maintain carbon sink.

  • Biodiversity and carbon-related processes should be taken as conservation targets.

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Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation